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2017 Agenda
The CIO Adventure: Now, Next and… Beyond

Here are the current proposed panels for this year. Want to discuss a panel topic? Check out the discussions on LinkedIn

Overcoming Big Data Disillusionment
CIOs have been getting the hard-sell on big data with the promise of harmonizing the fragmented architecture of enterprises—especially those having many complex products and a history of acquisitions. Yet organizations that have moved beyond pilots are finding challenges in getting their investments to pay off. Were expectations too high or is current big data technology just not yet ready for prime time? CIOs and Chief Data Officers (CDOs) will discuss the reality of big data in the enterprise, delivering on CXO initiatives while not compromising on enterprise architectural standards.
Pathways to Future Ready: The Digital Playbook

Moderator:

Now that much of the excitement and novelty around digital has worn off, what’s its impact on the bottom line? In this panel, we’ll discuss the optimal size of digital investments, where to start, and the expected returns. We’ll also discuss key management practices that can amplify digital investments for higher returns and how CIOs can help generate those returns.
Navigating the Clouds
Over the last few years Clouds have revolutionized application delivery, scalability, and support, but are they resolving or creating challenges around agility, privacy, intellectual property, and business continuity? Are private clouds, public clouds, or something in between best suited for supporting the size and growth of your organization? This panel will discuss the best practices in selecting and managing cloud providers.
Putting AI to Work
While the poster child of AI, the fully autonomous vehicle, is still five or more years out on the horizon, there are many implementations of AI that are available today or will be within the next year or so. AI technologies and AI-driven products are enabling new services never possible before, providing deep business intelligence, automating work, and cutting costs. AI also raises the fear of higher unemployment and social unrest. This panel will focus on how firms are implementing or how they expect to implement AI, including effectiveness, stage of adoption, and benefits, as well as the potential impacts on unemployment and society.
You Were Hacked—Now What?
In this age of mega breaches, as CIOs and CISOs are facing an ever-changing threat landscape and applying "whack-a-mole" methods in their security operations, it is just a matter of time before they experience the inevitable—"we got hacked." Popular wisdom is that enterprises should have a good plan for such incidents as it is a matter of when and not if. Different organizations have a wide range of capabilities and readiness when it comes to response and recovery. This panel, comprised of industry experts as well as day-to-day practitioners, will talk about best practices and methods, and how to ensure business continuity after a breach occurs.
Trusted Data: The Role of Blockchain, Secure Identity, and Encryption

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Enterprises are finally taking security seriously and beginning to adopt the next generation of technology: distributed ledgers ("blockchain"), secure identity mechanisms, and end-to-end encryption. These changes have the potential to revolutionize applications ranging from smart contracts to supply chain management, automation, and artificial intelligence. We’ll discuss how these new technologies will transform your business model and change the way you do business.
Running IT Like a Factory
As modern IT organizations embrace speed and quality, automate code delivery, and cut costs, they are becoming “factories” churning out digital capabilities. Our panelists will discuss what it means to modernize IT applications, virtualize IT infrastructure, and automate data center operations. They will share their experiences in transforming enterprise software into callable APIs, upgrading databases and middleware, developing with open source, moving to cloud with various lift-and-shift methods, automating delivery with DevOps, and measuring IT productivity with data.
Who’s Really Responsible for Technology?
Today, every company is a technology company. Tech has evolved from a tool to be implemented in service of the business to a core component upon which strategies are built. As we all “go digital” where does the tech buck stop? Can a responsible CEO really afford to delegate technology leadership any longer? And, if the CEO is now responsible for technology, what does that mean for the CIO or, for that matter, the Chief Technology Officer, Chief Digital Officer and Chief Marketing Officer?
Measuring ROI for Cybersecurity: Is It Real or a Mirage?

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Organizations are spending an ever-larger portion of their IT budgets on security. But what does it get them? Risk of a breach appears to be growing not shrinking. What level of investment will it take to bring risk to an acceptable level? Gartner says prevention is futile. So, what should organizations do? It is hard to go to the Board of Directors to ask for more investment when you can’t even measure the impact of current investments. During this session, we will explore the measurement and management of cybersecurity investments and how to steer the board’s expectations and the internal culture to put the organization on a glide path to a steady improvement versus a random walk.
Preparing for the Future of Work
In past decades, technology has replaced many routine tasks with automation. Now AI and robotics are enabling computers to do more complex work that was previously the sole domain of humans.  In addition, cloud, social media, and mobility make many “gig economy” workers as effective as full time employees.  What will the future of work look like? How will automation augment or replace current jobs?  How should CIOs and other leaders prepare their organizations for the changes to come?  In a fast-paced exchange of ideas, our panel of experts will discuss these questions and more.
Talent Wars in the Digital Age

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Increasingly, organizations are engaging with talent in new ways. There is a growing reliance on: using freelancers to acquire skills for project teams; contracting to outsource work; buying companies for talent (i.e., “acqui-talent”); and crowdsourcing solutions. Companies are also placing their own people in hubs and co-working spaces (e.g., Fintech Incubators) to immerse them in innovative environments. These new approaches of acquiring and using talent require very different workplaces that respond faster and in more collaborative ways to build value. We’ll discuss how CIOs are winning the talent wars both within IT and their larger organizations.
The New Ethics of Tech: Who’s Watching the Coders?
Algorithms guide an ever-increasing array of our decisions. Each day lines of code influence what news we see on Facebook, what movies we watch on Netflix, and what ads follow us across the Internet. In aggregate, the influence of human-written software has a profound impact on how we view the world. And then consider that someone somewhere is writing the code that may literally determine life and death—e.g., when a self-driving car will swerve to miss a pedestrian or turn into a crowded sidewalk to avoid a head-on collision. This panel will address what is all-too-often absent from the creation of smart technologies—the active management of the ethical implications of the choices made by subjective humans in the course of software development.
The CIO Adventure: Insights from the Leadership Award Finalists

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The MIT Sloan CIO Leadership Award honors executives who lead their organizations to deliver exemplary levels of business value through innovative use of IT. For the first time, the Symposium is bringing all the Finalists together for a lively exchange of innovative ideas and best practices.
Winning with the Internet of Things

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Estimates of the IoT business market are as high $10T, leading to lots of lofty talk and strategic positioning. Some companies are embracing IoT to generate operational efficiencies and to improve customer experience. Other firms are fundamentally transforming their business models. We will discuss how companies are capturing value from IoT by looking at what drives IoT opportunities, the new capabilities required, and the investments that are needed to succeed.
What Comes After Digital Transformation?
Becoming a digital organization is next! While the term “digital transformation” is much in vogue, relatively less attention is paid to designing organizations to best fulfill their digital strategies.  In this panel, we’ll talk about how traditional organizations change as digital transformation starts to take hold.  How do people work differently?  What happens to pace and structure? How do digital and non-digital parts of the organization interact? What should CIOs do to help?  Our panel of experts will discuss how they have helped their organizations become more digital.
Expanding the Reach of Digital Innovation
To compete in sectors where the customer experience is increasingly digitized, companies are scrambling to expand their portfolio of innovations—from new products and enhanced processes to complementary services and new business models. In the process, IT units are figuring out how to share responsibilities with and coordinate the efforts of internal stakeholder groups such as marketing, operations, and R&D, as well as the efforts of external parties such as vendors, business partners, start-ups, and even individual contractors and hobbyists. This panel will examine how companies are pursuing varied portfolios of innovations and how they might assess and enhance their innovation readiness.