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Help Shape the 2016 Agenda!

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Best Practices for Managing a Digital Innovation Portfolio

Moderator:
Nils Fonstad, SM ‘96, PhD ‘03, MIT Sloan Center for Information Systems Research

Panel description:
Many global companies are feeling growing pressure to rapidly respond to local business demands. MIT research has found that IT units are supporting these demands competitively in two fundamentally different ways: (1) reusing technology and business components and (2) engaging in off-platform experiments. In addition, to practice both types of innovation simultaneously, they are engaged in new collaborations with internal and external stakeholder groups to create a simple and relevant set of reusable components; foster their reuse; and engage in and learn from experiments. This panel discussion with leading CIOs will explore best practices for managing a portfolio of innovations.
Big Data 2.0: Next-Gen Privacy, Security, and Analytics

Moderator:
Prof. Alex ‘Sandy’ Pentland, PhD ‘82, MIT Media Lab

Panel description:
The first wave of big data has hit, creating great opportunities but also cracks in company security, worries about customer data privacy, and showing the limitations of current analytics. The second wave of big data is gathering strength now. The thought leaders and practitioners on this panel will discuss what Big Data 2.0 may look like, what security measures companies may have to take, how improved analytics can help us achieve stronger insights, how consumers are demanding a new privacy contract, and how some cutting edge companies are shining a light on this future.
How Blockchain Will Transform the Digital Economy

Moderator:
Prof. Christian Catalini, MIT Sloan

Panel description:
Blockchain is gathering momentum, transcending beyond bitcoin. It has the promise of propelling the ledger, one of the oldest and most important concepts in finance, into the Internet age. It also has the potential of improving cybersecurity, digital identity and audit trails. Applications range from smart contracts to supply chain management, automation and artificial intelligence. We’ll discuss how blockchain may upend your business model and revolutionize the way you do business.
How the On-Demand/Gig Economy is Redefining the Future of Work

Moderator:
Prof. Erik Brynjolfsson, PhD ‘91, MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy

Panel description:
The MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy has a major research focus on the Future of Work. This panel will bring together the very top academics in the field to share their knowledge and perspectives on recent trends in the organization of labor, including (1) the role of the On-Demand Economy in a Changing Labor Market; (2) Winners and Losers from Disruption by On-Demand Businesses, and (3) creating a new Social Contract for Work in the Second Machine Age.
Maximizing the Strategic Value of Your Data

Moderator:
Barbara Haley Wixom, MIT Sloan Center for Information Systems Research

Panel description:
In a digital economy, data—and the information it produces—is one of a company’s most important assets. Companies are delivering increased value from data by improving and innovating business processes and by monetizing data to sell or to differentiate core offerings. As companies explore new ways to generate value from their data, however, they need to consider new roles, structures, and practices to maximize their returns. In this panel we will discuss how leading firms treat their data asset in ways that deliver significant bottom-line returns and move the company forward strategically. We will also review how to build profitable business models with data-driven leaders and organizations.
Redesigning the Digital Workplace

Moderator:
Kristine Dery, MIT Sloan Center for Information Systems Research

Panel description:
The digital workplace is about a fundamentally different way of working. Influence, networks, and dynamic decisions become much more important than power, hierarchies, static decisions, processes, and rules that made sense in a slow-moving, traditional environment. We will challenge some of the popular beliefs around collaboration and discuss how high performing firms are combining a series of management levers (the 6-Ss: symbols, space, systems, social, sustaining leadership, systemic learning) to build digital workplaces that simplify working life. We will also discuss the actions CIOs should take to create or improve the digital workplaces within their own companies.
The Owner’s Guide to Platform Strategies

Moderator:
Prof. Marshall Van Alstyne, SM ‘91, PhD ‘98, MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy

Panel description:
Uber. Airbnb. Amazon. Apple. PayPal. All of these cutting-edge businesses are built on platforms: two-sided markets that are revolutionizing the way we do business. As digital networks increase in ubiquity, businesses that do a better job of harnessing the power of the platform will win. Whether platforms are connecting sellers and buyers, hosts and visitors, or drivers with riders, this session will discuss the “owner’s manual” for creating a successful platform business. But not every company can become a platform, so much of this session will be spent on helping practitioners measure where they are in a platform ecosystem, and how they can benefit from that position – or move to a different one.
The Perfect CIO
Panel description:
With technology and customer requirements changing at such a fast pace, organizations have to respond, innovate, and make decisions very fast. All of this requires extensive collaboration between different functions of the company. How do CIO’s maintain balance and keep all functions aligned? How do they prioritize and what are some of the challenges they face?
Thriving Through Digital Ecosystems

Moderator:
Peter Weill, MIT Sloan Center for Information Systems Research

Panel description:
Why ecosystems? Because MIT research found that companies with 50% or more of their revenues from digital ecosystems had higher revenues and higher profit margins than their industry’s average. Ecosystems move beyond linear supply chains to partnering with providers of complementary products and services (or sometimes competitors) to create a better customer experience, among other benefits. We’ll share MIT case studies and survey results and facilitate a conversation with digital leaders on how they are each brokering connections with their firms, customers and partners.
Transform Your Business Through IoT

Moderator:
Stephanie Woerner, MIT Sloan Center for Information Systems Research

Panel description:
We are entering the era of the connected business model. Potentially, any asset, person, product, process, or source of data can be connected, making a reality of the long forecast connected house, car, factory and ecosystem. Smaller and cheaper sensors—embedded technology in products like cars, oil wells, wearables, and business processes—will become the norm over the next decade. All this connectedness has the potential to radically change business models and the competitive landscape. Are you ready to capitalize on the transformational potential of IoT?
Working and Thriving in an Age of Brilliant Machines

Moderator:
George Westerman, MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy

Panel description:
Technology reshaped demand for skills in past decades. It will continue to do so in the future. Relative to twenty years ago, companies employ far fewer secretaries, while remaining secretaries do very different jobs. Demand for middle skill jobs has shrunk more than other jobs, but conditions are changing. Will robots destroy lower-skilled physical jobs? Will AI replace higher-skill “thinking” jobs? What skills can complement rather than compete against technology? Join us as a panel of experts discusses the future of jobs in an era of increasingly brilliant machines